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4 Contoh Drama Inggris yang Diperankan 2 Orang

Acting atau pementasan, kadang di sekolah disebut drama, adalah proses menyampaikan cerita, dimana tokoh-tokoh cerita diperankan oleh aktor.

Cerita tersebut disampaikan oleh aktor atau aktris di teater, panggung, film, atau radio dengan meniru kejadian sebenarnya.

Nah bila kamu sedang mencari teks atau script drama untuk diperankan di sekolah, ini adalah tempat yang tempat.

Kami akan menyajikan contoh script drama Bahasa Inggris singkat yang diperankan oleh 2 orang.

Berikut beberapa drama yang ada di buku Children’s Classics In Dramatic Form by Augusta Stevenson.

The Wise Crow

TIME: last summer.
PLACE: a meadow.

Characters:
THE CROW.
THE SPARROW.


[The CROW and the SPARROW meet at a spring.]

SPARROW. Ah me, the spring is dry!

CROW. All the springs are dry!

SPARROW. There may be water in the brook.

CROW. No, the brook is dry.

SPARROW. What shall we do?

CROW. There may be water in this pitcher. I will see. Aha! Here is water! Come and drink.

SPARROW. I cannot reach it. It is too low.

CROW. Stretch your neck!

SPARROW. I stretch and stretch—I cannot reach it.

CROW. Why, neither can I! Stretch as I will, I cannot reach it.

SPARROW. What shall we do?

CROW. We will break the pitcher. Come, now!

SPARROW. I strike and strike.

CROW. I strike and strike.

SPARROW. We cannot break it.

CROW. No, we cannot break it.

SPARROW. What shall we do?

CROW. Let us try to overturn it. Come, now!

SPARROW. I push and push.

CROW. I push and push.

SPARROW. We cannot overturn it.

CROW. No, we cannot overturn it.

SPARROW. We must have water! What shall we do?

CROW. Ah, I know the way to get the water!

(He drops pebbles in the pitcher.)

SPARROW. Why do you drop pebbles in the pitcher?

(He drops in more pebbles; the water rises.)

Please tell me why you do that.

CROW. Now come and drink, Miss Sparrow!

SPARROW. Why, I can reach the water How queer! How very queer!

The Wolf and The Lamb

TIME: last spring.
PLACE: a pasture.

Characters:
THE LAMB.
THE WOLF.


[The LAMB is drinking from the brook. The WOLF enters.]

WOLF. Aha! There is my dinner. Now I’ll make it seem that I ought to eat her. Lamb, Lamb, how dare you? How dare you?

LAMB. What do you mean, sir?

WOLF. How dare you muddle the water?

LAMB. The water is clear where you stand, sir.

WOLF. The water is muddled where I stand, miss.

LAMB. How can that be, sir?

WOLF. I say the water here is muddled.

LAMB. But, sir, the water runs from you to me.

WOLF. Oh, well, we will say no more about the water. Now just one year ago you called me names.

LAMB. How could that be, sir?

WOLF. I say you called me names, miss.

LAMB. But, sir, one year ago I was not born.

WOLF. Well, then, it was your father. It is all the same to me. I mean to eat you anyway.

The Selfish Woman

TIME: yesterday.
PLACE: the village.

Characters:
WOMAN.
BEGGAR.


[The SELFISH WOMAN is taking cakes from her oven. There is a knock at the door.]

WOMAN. Enter!

[The BEGGAR enters. She wears a long cloak.]

BEGGAR. I am hungry, good woman. Will you give me a cake?

WOMAN. The cakes are too large to give away. I will make a cake for you.

[She makes a very small cake and puts it in the oven.]

BEGGAR. I thank you, good woman.

[The woman takes the cake from the oven.]

WOMAN. This cake is too large to give away. I will make another cake for you.

[She makes a very, very small cake and puts it in the oven.]

BEGGAR. I thank you, good woman.

[The woman takes the cake from the oven.]

WOMAN. This cake is too large to give away. I will give you a slice of bread.

[She cuts a slice from a loaf of bread.]

BEGGAR. I thank you—

WOMAN. A slice is too much to give away. Here is a crust for you.

[The beggar shakes her head.]

BEGGAR. May you never taste cake again! May the very cake in your mouth seem to be crust! If you will not give, you shall not have!

WOMAN. Go, go!

[The beggar throws off her cloak; a FAIRY is seen.]

WOMAN. A Fairy! You are a Fairy?

FAIRY. I am the Fairy of Good Deeds. You would not give—you shall not have!

[The Fairy goes.]

WOMAN. As if cake could ever taste like bread! ‘Tis impossible—impossible!

(She eats a cake.)

What is this? I seem to be eating crust, dry crust. I’ll try another cake.

“will you give me a cake?”

(She eats another cake.)

Why, this too changes to crust! Ah me! The Fairy’s words were true. I would not give, I cannot have. Ah me! Ah me!

The Blind Men and The Elephant

TIME: a year ago.
PLACE: India.

Character:
THE DRIVER.
THE SIX BLIND MEN.


[The SIX BLIND MEN stand by the roadside, begging. The DRIVER comes with his elephant.]

BLIND MEN. A penny, sir! A penny!

DRIVER (throwing pennies). There, and there, and there! Now out of the way with you! I must take my elephant by.

FIRST BLIND MAN. I have never seen an elephant, sir.

OTHER BLIND MEN. Nor I! Nor I!

DRIVER. Do you know what he is like?

BLIND MEN. No, sir! No, sir!

DRIVER. Would you like to touch him?

BLIND MEN. Yes! Yes!

DRIVER. Come, then, and stand by him.

FIRST BLIND MAN (placing hand on elephant’s side). Well, well! Now I know all about him! He is exactly like a wall!

SECOND BLIND MAN (feeling the tusk). He is not like a wall! He is round and smooth and sharp. He is like a spear.

THIRD BLIND MAN (feeling the trunk). Both of you are wrong. He is like a snake.

FOURTH BLIND MAN (feeling a leg). Oh, how blind you are! He is round and tall like a tree!

FIFTH BLIND MAN (feeling an ear). Why, he is exactly like a great fan!

SIXTH BLIND MAN (feeling the tail). This elephant is not like a wall, or a spear, or a snake, or a tree, or a fan. He is exactly like a rope.

DRIVER. Ha, ha, ha!

[He goes, driving elephant and laughing.]

FIRST BLIND MAN. Ha, ha, ha! Hear how he laughs at you!

SECOND BLIND MAN. He laughs at you and the others.

THIRD BLIND MAN. He does not laugh at me!

FOURTH BLIND MAN. I say he laughs at you and the others.

FIFTH BLIND MAN. You cannot say he laughs at me!

SIXTH BLIND MAN. He laughs at all of you! He knows I spoke the truth.

[He goes.]

OTHER BLIND MEN. Hear him! Hear him!

[They go their different ways, shaking their fingers angrily at each other.]

 

 

 

 

Drama Inggris: Othelo by William Shakespeare
4 Contoh Drama Inggris yang Diperankan 2 Orang
3 Contoh Drama Fabel Bahasa Inggris (Diperankan 3 Orang)


 
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